The value of the blog

A couple weeks ago, I finished 5 draft posts that had been lingering for some time. This stemmed from Jesse McClean sharing via Twitter that he was going to revisit 5 drafts in 5 days. I decided to join him in this endeavor and as of this morning we’d collectively knocked down 10 posts. You can check out his blog here. As I was writing so often, I gave a lot of thought to the purpose and value of blogging as a learner.

Going back, Josh Stumpenhorst‘s blog, Stump the Teacher, was one of the first education blogs I read just as I was starting out on Twitter. Knowing Josh in person, I found it so interesting to read about his experiences as a teacher. I admired his willingness to share his philosophy and opinions, even if they differed from others. From here and from Twitter, I found many other blogs that interested me. My first blog predates all of this as I wrote about our adoption journey here. I wrote there with the purpose of keeping our family and friends current on our adoption and keeping our own written record of the process. Eventually, I started my professional blog on Blogger, and then I moved it to my own domain after some good conversation.

Vehicle for sharing

As a consumer, I’m still often amazed at how freely people share resources and ideas through their blogs and Twitter. As a contributor, I find writing is a great way for me to both reflect and to share my story with others. Dean Shareski’s keynote Sharing: The Moral Imperative brings together many examples of the far reaching effects of sharing our practices with others and makes a compelling case for our ‘obligation’ to share. While I’ve known sharing my work is important, I don’t think I’d given sufficient thought to the impact it can make. As a school leader, I move from sharing my work to sharing our collective work as a learning community…by sharing our story. Thanks to other educators sharing, I can also see what is truly possible and gain perspective that differs from my own. I’d love for others to share comments and feedback that open further dialogue as I write; at the same time, I know I don’t do enough of this for others.

Evidence of learning

At the same time, I started working on the structure of my blog to both make it a useful space for others to visit and to support my own reflection and learning. George Couros re-shared this piece about using your blog as a portfolio. He talks about the blog portion of his website being his learning portfolio, and he uses his local principal standards as categories for his posts. While I’ve visited George’s blog many times, I hadn’t really connected with that piece yet. This time I did. I added a page sharing the Illinois Performance Standards for School Leaders, and I started using those as my categories. Over the rest of the summer, my goal is to go back and categorize my previous posts. In the short time I’ve done this, I already find myself connecting to and reflecting on the standards more than I explicitly have in the past. Sometimes I find it tricky to decide which standard(s) to link. Rather than viewing my blog as something separate and the standards something I link to my performance evaluation (I know, I know…), they both gain strength and meaning when considered together. You can also read about this perspective on Jessica Johnson‘s blog over here. She’s an elementary principal in Wisconsin, who just realigned her blog to her principal standards. (Full disclosure: She’s already done re-categorizing her posts. Nice work!) I’ve also added a page with professional presentations as I’ve started having those opportunities in the past year.

Some next steps

As I’ve shared before, I sometimes have a hard time being satisfied with a blog post in the moment. I’m getting better at that. If I have more to share on a topic later, I can do that. Hitting publish isn’t the same as The End. So, along with going back to categorize my earlier posts, my first next step is to keep writing!

Another challenge as a school leader has been encouraging others to share openly and globally. The biggest step I can take to combat that is to model that sharing myself. And not just the rosy, sunshine, that-went-so-well moments. But the moments where I questioned myself or admitted to something I could have or should have done better. As I prepare for this new school year, I am excited for the conversations and the stories that could encourage others to take next steps of their own.