Tag Archives: Shane Parrish

Maximizing my own Summer learning: An #ILEdchat reflection

This week, the #ILEdchat team chatted about maximizing summer learning. (New to #ILEdchat? You can read more about how that started and what we do here.) As our team formed questions for the chat, my own hopes and plans for summer were heavy on my mind. I knew the time would pass all too quickly, and I didn’t want to head back to school with the same To Do list I had in June and a pile of regrets as to how I’d used my time. I knew that being intentional with my time could lead to great progress. Family time, my dissertation, my best friend’s wedding (the real deal…not the movie!), #NAESP14, teaching an online course, many much neglected home projects, preparing for the school year ahead, and improving my fitness were and still are all part of my summer master plan. As the chat unfolded, it was indeed encouraging to hear how others were approaching their summer plans, too. You can read the chat archive here for ideas on summer planning and some great reading suggestions from teachers and administrators across and beyond Illinois. I left our hour-long chat and have moved through the week considering the following ideas that certainly pertain to summer learning and progress but have relevance beyond:

  • Continue to share the terrific and the tough: There is power in sharing our hopes and plans with one another and taking on a role of encourager instead of solely needing to be encouraged. Admittedly, the latter is more how I felt in preparing for our chat. I am fortunate to benefit from a great support system, both virtually and face-to-face. As I work on my dissertation, I have a great accountability partner in my friend and former colleague, Brent. We share what we do accomplish, and he isn’t afraid to tell me when I need to get my act together and keep moving. I also have a PLN with people like Nicholas Provenzano, who I’ve only seen once face-to-face a couple years back at the ISTE Leadership Forum. We’ve never even had a conversation, but the post he shared about his own deep, personal struggles and the responses he received on his blog and Twitter are incredible examples of mutual support in which he was both supported and his willingness to share lifted others who share such struggles. 
  • Be intentional & disciplined: This morning, Daniel Pink shared a post by Shane Parrish , An 18-Minute Plan for Managing Your Day and Finding Focus. In exercise and time management, there are no shortage of plans to follow that promise great results, but there are often ideas to glean within them. I appreciate that this reinforces the importance of starting a day with a plan and ending it with reflection. The idea to set alarms to monitor progress throughout the day is worthwhile, especially in the summer when I have a bit more control over my schedule than during school days. During the year, I set my phone alarm for our morning half-day kindergarten dismissal, our afternoon half-day arrival, and for 5 minutes before school dismissed so that I was reminded to be part of those times. I think that could be a helpful strategy in monitoring my time in the summer, too. I know what I need to do, and I have to be disciplined in following through and intentional in planning and adjusting. 
  • Allow yourself to have fun! Looking back up at my summer list, there sure is a lot of opportunity for fun amidst the tasks! Recently a friend shared this article on Facebook about too much hurrying and what that can do to us and to our children. I can visualize the mom dragging her child along with reminders to hurry; I have been that Mom, that wife, that principal… Being intentional and disciplined means building in that time to not hurry, too,

A simple summer to do list quickly moved me to deeper reflection about how I really want to be all of the time, and it left me feeling encouraged and challenged. Seems summer learning is actually about much more than summer learning and task completion. To take thoughts to action, I will use my calendar to schedule my time and alarms during work time to stop and reflect. I will use running time to reflect, too.

In the chat we asked participants to finish this sentence they likely uttered in the Spring: “I can’t wait for summer so I have time to…”  Think about how you might finish this sentence in the Fall: “This summer was awesome because…”